Selene Goes With Deep-Hull Mod for Entire Fleet

 

A series of recent design changes to a small number of the Selene models, including the 53, which we wrote about here on OceanLines, will now be standard on all new Selenes, according to an announcement last week from Howard Chen at Jet-Tern Marine, the parent company of the Selene brand of trawlers.  In addition to some of the larger models that have already incorporated the new design, new 2010 Selene 38, 42 and 49 models are already in production.

According to Jet Tern, “The foundation of the new generation of Selene Ocean Trawlers is a deepening of the hull from the front bulkhead continuing all the way off. In addition, all of the next generation molds feature the “cruiser stern” as standard.”  The company listed the following benefits and implications of the design changes:

    * Without changing the draft, headroom in the engine room is increased by a foot or more. Some of this increased headroom is carried into the lazarette.
    * Each new mold is 1-2’ longer than its predecessor. This fact plus the added length of the cruiser stern increase the waterline length resulting in slightly greater hull speed.
    * Greater headroom permits fuel tanks of the same capacity to be higher but narrower, increasing the effective area in the engine room for improved access, storage, and usability.

    * Space for larger fuel capacity.
    * Engines are mounted relatively lower in the hull. This results in a flatter angle of the shaft, and therefore more efficient transmission of power to the propeller.
    * A prop tunnel is now molded in to the hull, further enabling a flatter propulsion angle and the resultant improvement in efficiency and performance.
    * Test tank results indicate the cruiser stern is 7%-8% more efficient through the water than traditional transoms. Some mechanical loss always must be accepted, but this efficiency could translate into 4%-5% improvement in fuel consumption at a given speed.
    * The cruiser stern, with its curved sides and bottom dissipates following seas for improved seakeeping in those conditions.
Of the three smaller 2010 models in production, the new Selene 38 and Selene 42, each with the cruiser stern, evolved from the popular double-cabin layouts of their first-generation counterparts. With LOAs of almost 42’ and 45’ respectively, the yachts are “proven and dependable,” according to Jet Tern.

The Selene 49 is a “next generation” evolution of the very popular Selene 48 model.  It features the new “deep hull” design with its cruiser stern, 10” increase in engine room headroom, and the larger, standard Cummins QSL 9.0 330 hp engine.   LOA is over a foot longer.  On the interior, that also translates to an 8” increase in the cockpit and 4” more in the salon.

According to Chen, the designer and builder of the Selene range, “Another significant difference is a wider body flybridge giving space for entertaining friends and family with style in the open air. This new flybridge layout incorporates an ‘L’ settee and table to one side, a bar/sink/BBQ unit on the other, and behind, ample room for a substantial dinghy and hydraulic crane.”

Jet Tern said the Selene 49 is still an excellent long range cruising boat with a D/L ratio at full load of 316, and A/B ratio at full load of 2.54.  With the standard Cummins at 1800 rpm it has a cruise speed of 8.6 kts for a range of 2,000 nm.  The company considers the 49 to be the flagship of the smaller end of the Selene fleet, intended to incorporate some of the room and luxury of the larger models in a package both affordable and easily handled by a couple.

Jet Tern now has four dealers in the U.S. for its Selene trawlers:

    * Selene Annapolis
    * Selene Seattle
    * Selene California
    * Selene Florida

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